beetroot and nectarine tart

This is a combination of flavours that I have eaten recently. Firstly inspired by a beetroot and dill dip that I had at the Clifton Lido in Bristol (it’s gorgeous there by the way, you should go, you deserve it) and also by a beetroot and nectarine salad that I ate in NYC.

I’m always looking for exciting veggie foods to try out and these seemed like some great ideas to meld together. I know they sound like strange bedfellows but they really do work well together. I fed this to a meat eater who told me (after I’d made it, I’m not that mean) that they aren’t really a fan of beetroot. It seemed to go down pretty well though and as a self professed lover of all things beetroot-y I really enjoyed it.

It’s a good idea to wear an apron and some rubber gloves whilst you prepare the beetroot. If you’re as messy as me then your kitchen may end up looking like an operating theatre, so you may as well look the part.

One of the best things about this tart is that you don’t have to weigh anything, yay! You can adjust the quantities to fit the size of your tart tin, mine is a pretty standard size.

beetroot and nectarine tart

Ingredients

10 sheets filo pasty
1-2 tbsp olive oil
1-2 medium fresh beetroot (peeled and thinly sliced)
5-6 tbsp ricotta
plenty of fresh dill and black pepper
1 nectarine (not too ripe, it’s best if it’s a little bit crisp)

Pre-heat the oven to 190°c and brush the inside of your tin with olive oil. Layer up the sheets of filo pasty to line the tin, brush each layer with a little olive oil as you go. Be sure to keep the pastry under a damp tea towel to stop it from drying out. I don’t worry about any pastry that hangs over the edges of the tin, but you can be as neat or rustic as you like. (Note that it’s rustic not messy/lazy.)
Spread the ricotta across the base of the tart and scatter it with roughly chopped dill and black pepper.
Next you can layer on the beetroot, over lap it a little if you like but don’t make it too crowded.
Bake the tart for about 35 minutes. The beetroot should be tender but not soft and the pastry should have browned around the edges.
Leave to cool for five minutes, this is best served warm rather than hot. Remove the stone from the nectarine and slice it, not too thinly, eighths is probably about right. Layer this onto the tart and add a final touch with a sprig of dill.

beetroot and nectarine tart